Breslin & Breslin, P.A.
201.546.5881
medical malpractice & personal injurySuper-Lawyers

Product Liability Archives

FDA device director supports closing approval loophole (1)

Last month, we wrote about federal legislators' efforts to close the loophole in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's medical device approval process. Now, it appears that a top official with the device division of the FDA agrees that such a change should be made. Hopefully, this will spur the legislation and prevent dangerous or defective products from making it to the marketplace in the future.

Johnson & Johnson CEO to step down in April

After a string of product recalls and products liability lawsuits, the chief executive officer of Johnson & Johnson is reportedly stepping down from his position later this spring. Although the New Jersey company's revenue has doubled in the past decade, the many product recalls in recent years have reportedly cost Johnson & Johnson more than $1 billion, as well as the serious hits to its public image and consumers' trust.

DePuy sold hip replacements overseas after FDA rejection (2)

Earlier this week, we began an in-depth look into the convoluted process by which Johnson & Johnson and its unit DePuy Orthopaedics sought FDA approval for its articular surface replacement devices, or ASRs. Initially, the FDA rejected the medical product, stating that additional clinical study was necessary to determine whether the product was safe.

DePuy sold hip replacements overseas after FDA rejection (1)

New documents have revealed that DePuy Orthopaedics, a unit of New Jersey-based Johnson & Johnson, continued to sell faulty hip replacement joints internationally after they were rejected for sale by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. At the same time, DePuy sold a similar defective product in the U.S. after was approved through the FDA's 501(k) loophole, which we detailed extensively in a previous product liability blog post.

Faulty hip replacements can cause long-term injuries

Recently, the faulty metal-on-metal hip replacement joints manufactured by DePuy Orthopaedics, a unit of New Jersey-based Johnson & Johnson, have become the subject of scrutiny and debate after causing pain and injury to thousands of patients. According to a few new studies, those defective products may continue to cause harm long after they are removed from the body.

Federal lawmakers seek to close FDA approval loophole

Last week, we wrote that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration had ordered additional research into the vaginal mesh products that have caused injury and even death to women throughout the country.

New Jersey company faces growing product liability suit

Earlier this week, we wrote about the recent influx of product liability lawsuits against New Jersey-based Johnson & Johnson regarding its vaginal mesh implant products, which have resulted in injury and death in hundreds of women throughout the country. The vaginal mesh suits are not the only litigation facing Johnson & Johnson at this time. The company is also defending itself against a growing class action products liability lawsuit after "mechanical failure" forced the recall of hundreds of artificial joints.

FDA orders NJ companies to study safety of vaginal mesh implants

Two New Jersey-based companies are among the more than 30 businesses that must conduct studies and clinical trials on the safety and effectiveness of vaginal mesh implants, according to recent media reports. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration ordered the studies after receiving multiple reports of injuries and fatalities caused by the defective products, an agency spokesman said.

Federal officials can't link defective drywall to injuries

The United States Consumer Product Safety Commission was not able to collect sufficient evidence proving that faulty drywall is a dangerous product capable of inflicting homeowners with illness or other ailments. The organization will therefore not ask the manufacturers to recall the products.

Federal lawmakers seek increase in auto recall fines

Later this week, the U.S. Senate Commerce Committee is scheduled to hear a bill which, if passed, will significantly increase the potential fines to automakers who delay automobile recalls for any reason. The bill also aims to toughen safety requirements for car manufacturers and commercial bus companies in the wake of several fatal car and bus accidents that have taken place in recent months.